Password Chef Recipe Guide

1

Here’s an example of a pretty good recipe.

Now let’s make one of our own.

2

Write your first step by tapping words in the word pool. Try writing this step:

“Find the number of vowels in the site name, enter it.”

3

Tap

See how the password changes with each site name? This is key! This is why one recipe is all you will need to produce unique passwords for all your accounts.

4

Write a few more steps to increase the length of your passwords.

Start a step with “Find the first three...” to add up to three characters in a single step.

5

Open the 100-site test to see which common requirements your password will meet—not just for the one site name you entered—but for 100 of the most popular sites.

6

We highly recommend adding a secret code, which protects your passwords if someone finds your recipe. Memorize it, because it vanishes after you save your recipe.

7

Continue adding steps until you receive your Stamp of Approval: the Chef’s assurance that all your passwords will be strong.

8

Name and save your recipe. They’re surprisingly easy to remember, but the app can store it, or use it to instantly generate a password for any site name you enter.

Glossary

Generated Password

This refers to the password generated by the recipe up to the current step.

Secret Code

This is a code, of any length, that can be integrated into a recipe, but which is never stored by the app. This allows users to write recipes that people without the code wouldn’t be able to interpret. We recommend using a secret code that incorporates special characters, which will help recipes produce passwords that satisfy the password requirements of some sites.

Site Name

This refers to the site name the recipe is using to generate a password. When entering one, leave out the “www.” as well as the extensions (.com, .co, etc). The app will also treat all upper-case letters as lower-case.

Advance It (a becomes b)

If the character targeted is an alphabet character, the result would be the following alphabet character. It is programmed to “wrap around” the alphabet, so that if the target was ‘z’, the result would be ‘a’. If the character targeted is a number, the result would be the following number. The app will similarly “wrap around” the first 10 digits, so that if the target was ‘9’, the result would be ‘0.’ If the target is a special character or a number, then no result will be generated.

Examples
a
Oz
039
equals b
Pa
140

Decrement It (b becomes c)

If the character targeted is an alphabet character, the result would be the preceding alphabet character. It is programmed to “wrap around” the alphabet, so that if the target was ‘a’, the result would be ‘z.’ If the character targeted is a number, the result would be the preceding number. The app will similarly “wrap around” the first 10 digits, so that if the target was ‘0’, the result would be ‘9.’ If the target is a special character or a number, then no result will be generated.

Examples
b
Up
408
equals a
To
397

Enter Characters.

This operation allows you to enter characters or a phrase of your choosing that will be recorded within the recipe. This operation is useful for adding length or special characters to your passwords.

Get its Alphabet Position

The result is the targeted letter’s position in the alphabet. If the target is a special character or a number, then no result will be generated.

Examples
c
Xi
m&m
equals 3
249
1313

Get its Keyboard Neighbor (to the left/to the right)

The result is the keyboard key to the left or to the right of the targeted character. Under settings, you can identify the keyboard layout you’re using (QWERTY is the default). If there is no alphabet character or number on the neighboring key, then the app “wraps around” the keyboard to find the next character or number. If the target is a special character, then no result will be generated. The case of the result will be the same as the target.

Examples (to the right)
d
Miss
007?
equals f
Zodd
118

Enter Corresponding Special Character

The result is the special character found on the keyboard key of the targeted number. This option will only appear when the target is a number.

Examples
5
18
equals %
!*

Reverse It

This puts the targeted characters in reverse order. This option will only appear when the target is expected to consist of more than one character.

Examples
abc
p@ls
equals cba
sl@p